Call for artistic project proposals

As part of the LGBTI and Queer Arts, Culture and Activisms Conference, we are looking forward to working with artists whose works highlight LGBTIQ representations, embodiments and activisms and who would like to participate in the collective companion art exhibition.

The art exhibition will happen from May 20th to June 12th, at the Université de Lorraine campus gallery (namely “Galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques”), located in Metz, France. The event will be advertised as part of the “Rainbow Weeks”, the local LGBTQ pride festival, organised by the LGBT centre « Couleurs Gaies ».

The art exhibition will come to its end during the conference, on June 11th and 12th. The conference will be held in Metz, France, on the university campus, as well. The artists will be invited to take part in a public round table for the occasion.

Artistic project proposals should comprise a description your work, ideally accompanied of pictures, and a short biography. Proposals should be sent by March 31st to the following emails:
– louise.barriere@univ-lorraine.fr
– melodie.marull@live.fr

The advisory board of the art gallery and conference organising committee will be involved in the selection.

Organising committee:
Louise Barrière – PhD Candidate, Popular Music – Université de Lorraine
Dr. Mélodie Marull – PhD, Visual Arts – Université de Lorraine

Art gallery advisory board:
Dr. Ophélie Naessens – Associate Professor, Contemporary Arts – Université de Lorraine
Dr. Anne-Laure Vernet – Associate Professor, Contemporary Arts – Université de Lorraine

What is the campus art gallery?

– An artistic project:
The gallery aims highlight artistic creation at the university by showcasing the works of emergent artists stemming from local, national and international scenes.

– A pedagogical project
The development of the art gallery is associated draws on pedagogical perspectives, and the [offre de formation] of the university. It follows four goals. (1) There, students may experiment with the exhibition of their art. (2) The opening of the art gallery aims to remain tightly linked with our MA programmes in scenography and cultural mediation. (3) Therefore, students may develop competences in accordance with their professional projects. (4) Students may realise internships at the art galley.

– A research-related project
Our art gallery aims to promote and showcase the practice of research-creation in visual arts. Research-creation is understood as an approach that combines creative and academic research practices, and allows established artists to get directly involved. That scientific perspective is underpinned by partnerships with a selective range of scientific events (symposiums, conferences, workshops, seminars, and so on), initiated by our associate researchers.

Appel à projets artistiques – Exposition Arts, Cultures & Activismes LGBTI et Queer

Dans le cadre du projet Arts, Cultures et Activismes LGBTI et Queer, nous cherchons des artistes dont les travaux portent sur les corporéités ou le militantisme LGBTIQ et qui souhaiteraient participer à une exposition collective.

L’exposition se tiendra à la galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques située à Metz, du 20 Mai au 12 Juin. Celle-ci sera également intégrée au programme des Rainbow Weeks, festival des fiertés LGBTQ organisé par l’association Couleurs Gaies.

L’exposition sera clôturée lors du colloque les 11 et 12 juin à l’Université de Lorraine, sur le campus du Saulcy (Metz). Les artistes sélectionné·es seront invité·es à cette occasion à rencontrer le public et participer à une table ronde.

Les propositions artistiques (œuvres plastiques ou audiovisuelles, performances, etc.) en lien avec les thématiques présentées peuvent donc être soumises dès à présent et jusqu’au 31 Mars 2020 à :
• louise.barriere@univ-lorraine.fr
• melodie.marull@live.fr

Dans ce cas, nous vous invitons à transmettre :
• un descriptif de la ou des œuvre(s) proposée(s), idéalement accompagné de photos,
• une brève notice biographique.

La sélection sera réalisée par les responsables de la galerie et le comité d’organisation du colloque.

Comité d’organisation :
Louise Barrière – Doctorante, Musiques Populaires. 2L2S – Univ. Lorraine
Mélodie Marull – Docteure, Arts. Chercheuse associée, CREM – Univ. Lorraine

Responsables de la galerie :
Ophélie Naessens – Maîtresse de conférence, CREM – Univ. Lorraine
Anne-Laure Vernet – Maîtresse de conférence, CREM – Univ. Lorraine

La Galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques ouvre ses portes sur l’Ile du Saulcy, dans le bâtiment A de l’ancien IECL de Metz, avec les soutiens de l’UFR ALL-Metz, le CREM et la DRAC Grand Est.

La Galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques, c’est :
• Un projet artistique
La Galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques est un espace de diffusion et de valorisation de la création artistique universitaire, ainsi que de la scène artistique locale, nationale et internationale émergente.

• Un projet pédagogique
La Galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques s’inscrit dans une perspective pédagogique en s’adossant à l’offre de formation existante à l’université de Lorraine, selon quatre perspectives : (1) espace d’expérimentation de mise en exposition du travail artistique (Licence Arts Plastiques); (2) mise en pratique des enseignements dispensés en scénographie (Master 2 arts de l’exposition et scénographie) ainsi qu’en médiation culturelle (Master 2 Expertise et Médiation culturelle) ; (3) développement de compétences directement reliées aux offres de débouchés professionnels ; (4) lieu de stages (médiation, régie technique, assistance de production, communication).

• Un adossement à la recherche
L’ambition de la galerie vise également la promotion et la diffusion de la recherche-création dans le domaine des arts visuels. Nous entendons sous le terme de recherche création une recherche scientifique associant volet théorique et volet pratique artistique, ce type de recherche permettant l’implication d’artistes confirmé·es. Cette perspective scientifique s’établit à travers des partenariats avec différents types de manifestations (exposition, journée d’étude, colloque, table ronde, etc.) initiées par les chercheur·es associé·es au projet

Call for Papers

LGBTI & QUEER ARTS, CULTURES, ACTIVISMS CONFERENCE (Metz, France)

Conference dates: 11th and 12th June 2020
CfP Deadline: 28th February)

In France, a few years after the law authorizing same-sex marriage, LGBTQ associations are now facing new struggles, fighting for access to assisted procreation or the creation of a communal archive center. Drawing on these dynamics, this conference aims at interrogating the bonds between LGBTQ forms of arts, cultures and activisms. We look forward to opening a space for academics and grassroots activists, whether they be engaged in institutional collectives or not, to exchange, reflect and dialogue. LGBTQ-related topics appear to be often overlooked in French research networks. We aim to make it more visible and richer, and make it dialogue with local, national and international networks of academics and activists.

“Culture”, here, has to be understood in its sociological sense, that is as an accrual of objects, practices, and features related to a defined social group. We will address both arts (theatre, cinema, music, fine arts, etc.) and festive, associative, activist, media fields that come along the existence of LGBTI and queer communities. Our perspective on politics and activism isn’t limited to legalist and assimilationist movements, that strictly aim to juridically make LGBTQ rights evolve. We wish to explore any form of LGBTQ resistance or visibility, may they develop in a legal frame or in an alternative context.

Indeed, while the terms “Queer” and “LGBT” are sometimes used as synonyms, some queer activists also claim for their distinction toward institutional politics, milieux and associations, that they designate as “assimilationist”. In the field of arts and culture, the Queercore music movement has embodied this distinction, as it developed in the United States in the 1990s and originated the “Don’t be Gay” manifesto, originally published in the punk hardcore fanzine Maximum Rock’n’Roll.

Camp is another form of expression that has served the definition of LGBTIQ representation and its political dimension. Described as a form of gay aesthetic that deals with humor and self-mockery, camp, as it appears in the theatre piece Angels in America written by Kushner, is described by Harvey (1998) as:

“a sign of gay resistance and solidarity in the face of a whole array of threats to the gay individual and his community, from AIDS to the discriminations and hypocrisies of the dominant culture. In Kushner’s text, camp is invested with a political charge predicated upon an irreducible and subversive gay difference.”

We will therefore have to understand these terms in their multiple senses, but, moreover, we will have to address the differences, the common points, the limits, and the tensions and confrontations of the artistic and cultural practices they designate.

Previous research on LGBT and queer movements have used various terms to underpin their thoughts –each corresponding to an academic field.


Duyvendak’s (1994) research falls within new social movements sociology. He distinguishes two main types of LGBTQ movements, each drawing on their own motivations and understanding of identity. “Instrumental movements” proceed to a strong distinction between their means and objectives. They act in order to get authority or an adversary to react. Meanwhile, identity movements (subcultural or counter-cultural) intertwine goals and activities: “the process of indentity making is a collective good and the guiding thread of their action.” Alongside with Duyvendak, Filieule (1998) distinguishes, within the world of LGBTQ associations of the early 1980s, an “activist tendency” and a “subcultural tendency”. Nevertheless these categories aren’t strictly enemies, and movements might borrow just as well from one as from the other (Duyvendak, Op. Cit.). We might thus as well look at their relationship.

Geographer Gordon Brent Ingram developed in 1997 the concept of “Queerscape” as he works on public space. Queerscape is

“(…) not only a landscape (as based on the Flemish root schap) with sexual minorities. A queerscape is also an aspect of the landscape, a social overlay, where the interplays between assertion and marginalization of sexualities are in constant flux and the space for sexual minorities is decentered in terms of increasingly supporting stigmatized activities and identities. Queerscapes embody processes that counter those that directly harm, discount, isolate, ghettoize, and assimilate. A queerscape is, therefore, a cumulative kind of spatial unit, a set of places, a plane of subjectivities constituting a collectivity, which involve multiple alliances of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transsexuals and which support a variety of activities, transactions, and functions. At least for some time to come, a queerscape nearly always overlaps with and is surrounded by social groups where heterosexuality is the ‘norm.’ Like the landscape, the queerscape is a cultural construct that provides a territorial basis for considering opportunities for and persistent disparities in access to public space and various respective services and amenities, as well as options for personal and collective expression.” (Ingram, 1997).

From there on, the concept has also been adapted to film studies (for example, see Gras-Velazquez, 2012; Keshti, 2009; Leung, 2001; Kim, 2017; Marchetti, 2017), to popular music studies (Clifford-Napoleone, 2015, 2016), or media studies (Schwartz, 2016).

All of these references come with a myriad of topics and events, well likely to be analyzed. We encourage you to follow three streams of research. For each of them, we mention examples of topics and field your research might look at. Nonetheless, this list has no vocation to be exhaustive nor mandatory.

We also wish to receive propositions of contributions addressing and questioning the intersection of different identity groups and their respective struggles (for more information on the concept of intersectionality, refer to Crenshaw, 1989 or Hill Collins, 2016). We will give a particular attention to papers that investigate how queerness interacts with race or class, as it was for example analysed by Victor Ukaegbu (2007) during his researches on the black queer theatre from post- war Britain, or in Andreana Clay’s (2007) work on Me’Shell Ndegeocello’s career as a bisexual black hip-hop artist and her influence on a whole generation of queer feminists of color.

– Bridging LGBTQ arts, cultures and politics.

We aim to address institutional politics and official artistic frames (museum, national theaters, cinema theaters), as well as alternative fields (squats, amateur practices, informal activist groups). On the one hand, we draw our references from Skadi Loist’s (2015) PhD thesis on LGBT/Q film festivals, Xavier Lemoine’s (2001) works on USA queer theatre, or Robert Mills’ (2008) theories on the “queer museum”. On the other hand, we wish to recall that LGBT and Queer movements also developed within subcultural and alternative spaces. Philipp Meinert (2018) therefore relates the history of LGBTQ punks, Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone (2015), Florian Heesch and Niall Scott (2016) look, in the same way, at metal musics. Not to limit our investigations to music, we might as well study the “Queer street art movements”.
Moreover, similar dynamics have also been observed in sports: from the institutional side of the Gay Games, to the alternative field with collective such as “Unity Queer Skateboarding” that gathers queer people around the skateboarding scene.

We, for example, wish to receive submissions that address the circulation of these practices between an underground or subcultural paradigm and a mainstream or institutional culture. Finally, submissions might also look at consumer activism. These last few years, fans of a TV show or a license have rallied together to “save” cultural object starring LGBTQ characters of intrigues, whose production called it a day. The most notorious case is, of course, Sense 8, the Netflix TV show, but others, such as One Day At A Time, have known a similar story. Not to mention the Harry Potter case, and the big question around Dumbledore’s homosexuality that has generated a lot of debates and controversy.

– The histories of LGBTQ struggles and their up-to-dateness.

Cinema, television, theatre… From Philadelphia (Demme, 1993) to 120BPM (Campillo, 2017), the history of LGBTQ struggles has been largely represented. We could also mention Milk (Van Sant, 2008), Pride (Warchus, 2014), or even Angels in America (first as a theatre piece – Kushner, 1991 -, and then as a TV show – Nichols, 2003). How did some art works, creations, happenings happen to form the heritage of a LGBTQ culture? Looking beyond the objects themselves, their exhibition circumstances, or on the contrary their concealment, emphasize visibility-related issues. To what extent, have some artists or stakeholders of LGBTQ history been hidden (post-mortem included)? What compensation strategies have later arisen? This should also lead to interrogate the strength of normativity within queer spaces, as noticed Carmen H. Logie and Marie-Jolie Rwigema (2014) during their investigations within lesbian, bisexual and queer women of color’s community in Toronto.

Moreover, while the question is older and recurring in the history of French LGBTQ movements, the production of the movie 120 BPM, in 2017, quickly became an occasion for Parisian activists to build a collective dedicated to LGBTQ community archives. The group’s creation follows years of inter-associative negotiation with Paris’ city council, for the purpose of creating a conservation center. Alongside with this dynamic, we aim to look at archives and their roles in the formation of LGBTQ culture(s). In that sense, we look at archives as both cultural objects, part of an LGBTQ legacy, and as historical sources that inform us on the lifestyles, behaviors and claims that come along social movements, and their evolution in time. How do present activists look at these sources? To what extent do younger activists know and have access to these archives? What history of activist, cultural and associative practices do they tell us?

– LGBTQ bodies and activist embodiments in arts and culture.

In Ce que la sida m’a fait (What AIDS has done to me), Elisabeth Lebovici describes the consequent space that artists took in activist groups such as ACT UP. Beyond a singular and affective approach of the archives, she emphasizes the inherent force of minority representations. The artist’s body, as it highlights the issues and the emergency of political struggles, conveys a form of individual emancipation, whose potential remains nonetheless communal. Therefore, these practices, that aren’t limited to aesthetics but have to be thought as activist strategies, are rooted in a History of fights (Lebovici, 2017) and testify that the body stands at a singular place within collective and artistic mobilizations. Following that line, the place of affects, both within artistic practices and research activities, might be discussed.

Moreover, Renaud Bret Vitoz develops an elaborated analyze in his article “Penser le queer avant le queer (XVIe-XVIIe siècles)” (“Theorizing queer before queer (16th-17th centuries)”), and gives us the chance to understand, within art history, a corpus that we could qualify as “proto-queer”. Avoiding anachronisms, we can’t nowadays look at some works without thinking of specific later-elaborated theories. We wish to address their seminal aspect and understand the issues of their potential rediscoveries and reinterpretations.

Finally, the trans-historical quality of Renate Lorenz’s Art queer, a freak theory, testifies of the plasticity of her research, and her will to explore new time perspectives on art. The construction of a reflexion on LGBTQ bodies might connect ancient works with contemporary claims. Therefore, we also encourage you to submit works that rely on an emancipatory approach of art history (Lorenz, 2018: 2).

We invite graduate students, early career researchers as well as more established scholars from all relevant fields and disciplines to send us their paper proposals by February 28th. Proposals should be no more then 300 words. They should be accompanied by a short biography and sent to both these contacts:
louise.barriere@univ-lorraine.fr
melodie.marull@live.fr

The conference will happen on the 11th and 12th June 2020, in Metz – France.

An art exhibit will happen alongside with the conference, at the campus gallery, from May the 20th to June the 12th. It will also be part of the “Rainbow Weeks”, the local LGBTIQ Pride Festival.

We therefore also wish to receive art pieces proposals (visual and audiovisual pieces, performances, etc.) related to the topics listed in this call for papers.

In this case, we invite you to send us:
– A description of the piece(s) you would like to exhibit and, if possible, pictures.
– A short biography.

The organizing committee and the art gallery managers will make a selection.

References list

Baroque, Fray & Eanelli Tegan (trad) (2016), Vers la plus queer des insurrections, Paris : Libertalia
Burk, Tara Jean-Kelly (2015). Let The Record Show: Mapping Queer Art and Activism in New York City, 1986-1995. Thèse de doctorat.
Clay, Andreana (2007). Like an Old Soul Record: Black Feminism, Queer Sexuality, and the Hip-Hop Generation. Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism 8(1), 53-73. Duke University Press.
Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2015). Queerness in heavy metal: Metal Bent. London & New York: Routledge. Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2016). Metal, masculinity and the queer subject. In Heavy Metal, Gender and Sexuality (pp. 63-76). Routledge.
Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2018). Queering Kansas City Jazz: Gender, Performance, and the History of a Scene. University of Nebraska Press.
Duyvendak, Jan Willem (1994), Le poids du politique. Nouveaux mouvements sociaux en France. Paris : L’Harmattan. Fillieule, Olivier (1998). Mobilisation gay en temps de sida. Les études gay et lesbiennes, 81-97.
Fillieule, Olivier, & Duyvendak, Jan Willem (1999). Gay and lesbian activism in France: Between integration and community-oriented movements. The global emergence of gay and lesbian politics: National imprints of a worldwide movement, 184-213.
Gras-Velázquez, Adrian (2012). Queering and De-queering the Home: Private and Public Space in Contemporary Spanish Cinema. The International Journal of the Humanities, 9, 257-68.
Harvey, Keith. (1998). Translating camp talk: Gay identities and cultural transfer. The Translator, 4(2), 295-320.
Ingram, Gordon Brent, Bouthillette, Anne-Marie, & Retter, Yolanda (Eds.). (1997). Queers in space: Communities, public places, sites of resistance. Bay Press.
Kheshti, Roshana (2009). Cross‐Dressing and Gender (Tres) Passing: The Transgender Move as a Site of Agential Potential in the New Iranian Cinema. Hypatia, 24(3), 158-177.
Kim, Ungsan (2017). Queer Korean cinema, national others, and making of queer space in Stateless Things (2011). Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema, 9(1), 61-79.
Lebovici, Elisabeth (2017), Ce que le sida m’a fait : Arts et activisme à la fin du XXe siècle, JRP Ringier, Éditions Maison Rouge.
Leperlier, François (2006). Claude Cahun, l’exotisme intérieur, Paris : Fayard, 2006.
Leung, Helen Hok-sze (2001). Queerscapes in Contemporary Hong Kong Cinema. positions: east asia cultures critique 9(2), 423-447. Duke University Press.
Logie Carmen H. & Rwigema Marie-Jolie (2014). “The Normative Idea of Queer is a White Person”: Understanding Perceptions of White Privilege Among Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women of Color in Toronto, Canada. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 18:2, 174-191.
Loist, Skadi (2015), Queer Film Culture: Performative Aspects of LGBT/Q Film Festivals, Thèse de doctorat en philosophie, Université de Hambourg, Allemagne.
Lorenz, Renate & Bortolotti, Marie-Mathilde (2018), Art queer: une théorie freak, Paris : B42.
Marchetti, Gina (2017). Handover Bodies in a Feminist Frame: Two Hong Kong Women Filmmakers’ Perspectives on Sex after 1997. Screen Bodies, 2(2), 1-24.
Meinert, Philipp (2018). Homopunk History. Mayence: Ventil Verlag.
Plana, Muriel, & Sounac, Frédéric (dir) (2015). Esthétique(s) queer dans la littérature et les arts : sexualités et politiques du trouble. EUD-Editions Universitaires Dijon.
Rüegg, Jana (2018). From Content to Context: A Comparative Analysis of the Covers of Translated Versions of Sara Stridsberg’s Beckomberga. DiGeSt, Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies , 5(2), 23-44.
Schwartz, Andi. (2016). Critical Blogging: Constructing Femmescapes Online. Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, No.9.
Schulman, Sarah. (2018). La Gentrification des esprits, Paris : B42.
Summers, Claude (Ed.). (2012). The Queer Encyclopedia of Music, Dance, and Musical Theater. Cleis Press Start.
Ukaegbu, Victor (2007) Grey silhouettes: black queer theatre on the post-war British stage. In: Godiwala, D. (ed.) Alternatives Within the Mainstream II: Queer Theatres in Post-war Britain. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 322-338.

Organizing committee

Louise Barrière (PhD student in Arts, 2L2S – Université de Lorraine)
Dr. Mélodie Marull (PhD in Arts, CREM – Université de Lorraine)

Scientific committee

Dr. Karine Espineira (PhD in Sociology, LEGS – Université Paris 8)
Dr. Isabelle Gavillet (Associate Professor in Media Studies, CREM – Université de Lorraine)
Dr. Olivier Goetz (Associate Professor in Theatre Studies, 2L2S – Université de Lorraine)
Prof. Dr. Claire Lahuerta (Professor in Visual Arts, CREM – Université de Lorraine)
Dr. Xavier Lemoine (Associate Professor in American Studies, LISAA – Université Paris-Est Marne-La-Vallée)
Prof. Dr. Maria Nengeh Mensah (Professor in Feminist Studies – Université du Québec À Montréal)
Prof. Dr. Muriel Plana (Professor in Theatre Studies – LLA CREATIS – Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès)
Dr. Massimo Prearo (PhD in Political Studies – EHESS)
Dr. Nelly Quemener (Associate Professor in Media Studies, IRMECCEN – Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Appel à contributions

COLLOQUE ARTS, CULTURES ET ACTIVISMES LGBTI ET QUEER (Metz, France)

Dates du colloque : 11 et 12 juin 2020
Date limite d’envoi des propositions : 28 février 2020.

Quelques années après la loi française du « Mariage pour tous », les associations LGBTQI sont animées par de nouvelles luttes, autour de la PMA ou de la conservation de leurs archives. En s’appuyant sur ces dynamiques actuelles ou passées, ce colloque souhaite interroger les liens entre arts, cultures et activismes LGBTQI et ouvrir pour ce faire un espace d’échanges, de réflexions et de dialogues tant aux universitaires qu’aux acteur-rice-s de terrain.

Nous entendons « culture » en son sens sociologique, c’est-à-dire comme un ensemble d’objets, de pratiques et de traits spécifiques à un groupe social défini ; c’est pourquoi nous nous intéresserons aussi bien aux arts (théâtre, cinéma, musique, arts plastiques, etc.) qu’aux cadres festifs, associatifs, militants, médiatiques qui accompagnent l’existence de communautés LGBTI ou Queer.

Notre perspective sur la politique et le militantisme ne se limite pas aux mobilisations légalistes, visant à faire évoluer les droits des personnes LGBTIQ (Lesbiennes, Gays, Bisexuel-le-s, Trans, Intersexe et Queer) au sens strict et juridique. Il s’agira également de prendre en compte toute forme de visibilisation des questions LGBTQI ou de résistance aux discriminations, que celles-ci se développent dans un cadre visant à faire évoluer la loi, ou dans un contexte alternatif.

Bien que les expressions « Queer » et « LGBTI » soient parfois utilisées comme synonymes, certains activistes Queer appellent pourtant à se distinguer des politiques, milieux et associations institutionnels qu’ils considèrent comme assimilationnistes. Dans le champ des arts et de la culture, cette divergence se concrétise par exemple avec le mouvement musical Queercore, qui se développe aux États-Unis dans les années 1990 et se trouve à l’origine d’un manifeste intitulé « Don’t be Gay » publié dans le fanzine punk hardcore Maximum Rock’n’Roll.

D’autres termes et modes d’expression, comme le camp (Newton, 1972) ont également pu servir la réflexion sur les identités culturelles LGBTQI et leurs dimensions politiques. Harvey (1998) écrit ainsi, à propos de la pièce Angels in America de Kushner : « Angels in America présente le camp comme un signe de résistance et de solidarité gay face à un large éventail de menaces à l’encontre à la fois des individus et de la communauté homosexuels, du SIDA aux discriminations, en passant par les hypocrisies de la culture dominante. Dans le texte de Kushner, le camp est investi d’une charge politique, qui s’inscrit dans la revendication d’une différence homosexuelle irréductible et subversive » (notre traduction).

S’il faudra alors comprendre ces termes dans leurs sens multiples, il s’agira finalement surtout de nous intéresser aux différences, aux points communs, aux limites, aux mises en tension et confrontations des pratiques artistiques et culturelles qu’ils désignent.

Les recherches déjà existantes sur les mouvements LGBTI et Queer ont pu être pensées en différents termes — relevant également de disciplines différentes que nous souhaitons faire dialoguer en proposant un projet inter-laboratoires.

Duyvendak (1994) inscrit par exemple les recherches sur les mouvements LGBTQI dans la sociologie des nouveaux mouvements sociaux. Il en distingue alors deux types principaux, qui diffèrent par leur motivation et leur rapport à l’identité. Les mouvements instrumentaux opèrent ainsi une distinction importante « entre moyens et objectifs » (1994 : 66), ils agissent « pour obtenir une réaction d’une autorité ou d’un adversaire » (ibid.), tandis que les mouvements identitaires (subculturels ou contre-culturels) mêlent buts et activités : « le processus de construction de l’identité est le bien collectif et c’est le fil conducteur de leur action » (ibid.).

Dans la même lignée, Filieule (1998) distingue dans les associations LGBT du début des années 1980 une « tendance militante » — celle du CUARH (Comité d’Urgence Anti-Répression Homosexuelle) ou de Gai Pied — d’une tendance subculturelle — celle du journal Samouraï ou de la radio pirate Fréquence Gaie. Pour autant, ces deux catégories ne sont pas strictement opposées, et il arrive que certains mouvements empruntent aussi bien à l’une qu’à l’autre (Duyvendak, Op. Cit.) ; c’est pourquoi nous pourrons également nous intéresser à leurs relations.

Le géographe Gordon Brent Ingram développe quant à lui dès 1997, dans le cadre de travaux sur l’espace public, le concept du « queerscape » qu’il définit comme « un aspect du paysage social (…) incarnant un ensemble de processus s’érigeant à l’encontre de ceux qui blessent, réduisent, isolent, enferment dans des ghettos ou annihilent » les minorités sexuelles. Ce concept a depuis été adapté à des études portant sur des objets ou pratiques artistiques comme le cinéma (voir par exemple Gras-Velazquez, 2012 ; Keshti, 2009 ; Leung, 2001 ; Kim, 2017 ; Marchetti 2017), ou dans une moindre mesure la musique (voir notamment Clifford-Napoleone, 2015, 2016), ainsi qu’à des recherches sur les médias (par exemple Schwartz, 2016).

Ces références montrent une profusion d’objets et d’événements à analyser. Cependant, dans le domaine académique les travaux dédiés à ce type de sujets sont particulièrement issus ou diffusés dans le monde anglo-saxon. Pour autant, deux événements — une journée d’étude et un colloque — abordant les questions LGBTQI ont été organisés en France en 2019 : la première s’est tenue à l’Université du Havre, le 1er mars et porte sur les festivités militantes ; le second aura lieu à l’Université Paris Est du 3 au 5 juin et s’intéresse à l’héritage des émeutes de Stonewall. Ces événements montrent l’émergence de nouvelles dynamiques dans la recherche française en sciences humaines et sociales.

Dans le prolongement de ces projets, nous souhaitons engager le développement d’un réseau de chercheurs et chercheuses au sein de l’Université de Lorraine et au-delà. Nous entendons de cette manière aborder les thématiques susmentionnées en dialogue avec des acteurs et actrices de terrain et proposons pour ce faire de suivre trois axes de recherches et d’intervention, développés ci-après. Nous précisons pour chacun d’eux des exemples de terrains que pourront investir les recherches portées par le réseau universitaire et associatif formé autour de ce projet, pour autant cette liste n’a vocation ni à être exhaustive ni à constituer un inventaire de thématiques devant obligatoirement être traitées.

Pour l’ensemble des axes, nous encourageons également les propositions de contributions s’inscrivant dans une perspective intersectionnelle (pour plus d’informations à ce sujet, se référer à Crenshaw, 1989). Nous accorderons une attention particulière aux interventions qui étudient la manière dont les identités LGBTQI interagissent avec la race (au sens social) ou la classe, comme l’ont par exemple fait Victor Ukaegbu (2007) lors de ses recherches sur le théâtre Queer issu de la diaspora Africaine dans la Grande-Bretagne d’après-guerre, ou encore Andreana Clay (2007) dans ses travaux sur la carrière de l’artiste hip hop, afro-américaine et bisexuelle, Me’Shell Ndegeocellos dont les œuvres ont influencé toute une génération de personnes Queer et féministes racisées.

  • Les liens entre arts, cultures et politiques LGBTQI

Nous nous intéresserons tant aux politiques institutionnelles et aux cadres artistiques officiels (créations exposées dans des musées, centre d’arts, diffusées dans des théâtres nationaux ou des cinémas) qu’alternatifs (collectifs militants, squats, pratiques artistiques amateurs). Nous nous appuierons sur des travaux comme ceux de Skadi Loist (2015) qui s’intéresse dans sa thèse de doctorat aux festivals de films LGBT et Queer, ou de Xavier Lemoine (2001) qui se penche quant à lui sur le théâtre Queer aux États-Unis, ou encore de Robert Mills (2008) qui théorise le « musée queer ». Pour autant les mouvements LGBTI et Queer appellent aussi à se développer dans des espaces alternatifs et subculturels : Philipp Meinert (2018) raconte ainsi l’histoire des acteurs LGBTQI de la scène punk et Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone (2015), Florian Heesch et Niall Scott (2016) s’intéressent, dans une perspective similaire, à la musique metal. Sans se limiter à la musique, nous pourrons nous pencher sur le « Queer street art movement ». Des dynamiques semblables sont observables dans le domaine du sport, avec du côté institutionnel les Gay Games, et de l’autre des collectifs informels comme le projet Unity Queer Skateboarding qui a vocation à rassembler des personnes LGBTQI autour de la pratique du skateboard. Il s’agira de nous demander si ces objets et ces pratiques peuvent circuler d’un paradigme underground ou subculturel vers une culture mainstream, voire institutionnelle.

Enfin, nous pourrons également nous confronter à des formes d’activismes de consommateur‑rice-s. Ces dernières années, les fans d’une série ou d’une licence se sont à plusieurs reprises mobilisé-e-s pour « sauver » des objets culturels présentant des personnages et des intrigues LGBTQI dont la production devait être arrêtée. Le cas le plus notoire est à ce titre sans doute celui de la série Sense 8, mais d’autres ont connu des formes similaires de mobilisation, comme One Day At A Time. Sans mentionner le cas d’Harry Potter, dont la question de l’homosexualité de Dumbledore a engendré de nombreux débats et polémiques.

  • L’histoire des luttes LGBTQI et son actualité

Au cinéma, à la télévision ou au théâtre, de Philadelphia (Demme, 1993) à 120 Battements par Minute (Campillo, 2017), l’histoire des luttes liées aux mouvements LGBTQI a fait l’objet de nombreuses représentations : citons par exemple Milk (Van Sant, 2008), Pride (Warchus, 2014), ou encore Angels in America (d’abord présentée sous forme de pièce de théâtre — Kushner, 1991 ; puis adaptée en série télévisée – Nichols, 2003). Comment certaines œuvres, créations, happenings deviennent alors patrimoine d’une culture LGBTQI ? Au-delà des objets en eux-mêmes, leurs conditions de monstration ou au contraire leur occultation soulignent des enjeux relatifs aux questions de visibilité. Dans quelles mesures certain-e-s acteurs et actrices, certain-e-s artistes ont été silencié-e-s (y compris à titre posthume) et quelles stratégies de réparation ont pu par la suite émerger ? Ceci devrait aussi nous amener à interroger le poids de la normativité (par exemple de la blanchité) au sein même des espaces LGBTQI, comme l’ont noté Carmen H. Logie et Marie-Jolie Rwigema (2014) lors de leur enquête dans les communautés de femmes lesbiennes, bisexuelles et Queer racisées à Toronto.

En outre, bien que la problématique soit plus ancienne et récurrente dans l’histoire des mouvements LGBTQI français, la sortie de 120 Battements par Minute (Campillo) en 2017 s’est transformée en occasion pour les militant-e-s parisien-ne-s de fonder un collectif dédié à la question des archives LGBTQI. Celui-ci fait suite à des années de négociations inter-associatives avec la mairie de Paris en vue de la création d’un centre de conservation. Dans la logique de cette dynamique, devenue cruciale au sein des mouvements, collectifs et associations LGBTQI, nous nous proposons d’interroger les archives et leurs liens avec la formation de culture(s) LGBTQI et l’articulation d’une histoire militante. Il s’agit de voir les archives à la fois comme des objets culturels, constitutifs d’un patrimoine LGBTQI, mais aussi comme des sources historiques, nous renseignant sur des manières de faire, d’être, sur les revendications des mouvements, et sur leurs évolutions au fil du temps. Comment les militant-e-s des causes LGBTQI regardent-ils ces archives aujourd’hui ? Quelles connaissances les jeunes militant-e-s ont-ils de ces archives ? Quelles histoires des pratiques militantes, culturelles, associatives et de leur évolution au sein des mouvements LGBTQI ces archives peuvent-elles nous permettre de retracer ? Quel rapport les acteur-rice-s actuel-le-s des mouvements LGBTQI entretiennent-ils et elles avec l’histoire de ceux-ci ? Quelle place y occupe la question des archives, localement et nationalement ?

  • Les corps LGBTQI et les corporéités militantes dans les arts et la culture

Dans Ce que le sida m’a fait, Elisabeth Lebovici décrit la place conséquente investie par les artistes au sein de groupes activistes tels qu’ACT UP. Au-delà d’une approche singulière et affective des archives, l’autrice souligne la force intrinsèque de la représentation par et pour les minorités. Le corps de l’artiste, lorsqu’il cristallise les enjeux et l’urgence de luttes politiques, se fait vecteur d’une émancipation individuelle au potentiel néanmoins collectif. Ainsi, ces pratiques, qui ne sauraient se limiter à des esthétiques, mais qu’il convient également d’envisager comme des stratégies militantes, s’enracinent dans une histoire des luttes (Lebovici, 2017) et attestent de la place singulière de l’individu dans les mobilisations collectives comme artistiques : les trajectoires personnelles, au prisme de l’art comme de l’action militante, font corps avec la communauté. Dans La Gentrification des esprits (2018), Sarah Schulman trace des liens entre l’épidémie du sida à New-York dans les années 90, la gentrification et les conditions des pratiques artistiques (théâtrales, performatives et photographiques en particulier) des minorités touchées par ces deux crises. Le caractère profondément corporel de ces productions est manifeste et les pratiques artistiques militantes donnent la plupart du temps une place nodale au(x) corps. Les questions relatives à la posture dans l’espace public, à l’apparence et aux attitudes corporelles militantes pourront être abordées. Dans des dynamiques similaires, la charge de l’affect, tant dans les pratiques artistiques que dans l’activité de la recherche fera l’objet de discussions.

Par ailleurs, l’analyse élaborée par Renaud Bret Vitoz dans son Introduction, penser le queer avant le queer (XVIe-XVIIe siècles) (voir Plana et Sounac, 2015 : 205-211) nous conduit à percevoir dans le champ de la création artistique un corpus que nous qualifierions de proto-queer (Aliaga, 2011 : 157). En se méfiant de tout anachronisme, il est indéniable que le regard que nous portons aujourd’hui sur certaines œuvres ne peut se défaire de bagages théoriques particuliers et il pourra être pertinent d’en souligner le caractère potentiellement précurseur comme de saisir les enjeux de leurs éventuelles redécouvertes et relectures.

Enfin, la qualité trans-historique du texte de Renate Lorenz Art queer, une théorie freak (2018) témoigne quant à lui de la plasticité de sa recherche et de sa volonté d’explorer de nouvelles perspectives temporelles de l’art. La construction d’une réflexion autour des corps LGBTQI peut, au-delà d’un adossement iconographique, trouver dans des œuvres antérieures des analogies avec des sphères de revendications plus contemporaines. Ainsi, les travaux relevant d’une approche de l’histoire de l’art comme pratique émancipatrice (Lorenz, 2018 : 3) peuvent être envisagés.

L’appel est ouvert jusqu’au 28 février 2020 aux jeunes chercheur-e-s (masterant-e-s, doctorante-s, jeunes docteur-e-s), mais également aux enseignant-e-s chercheur-e-s et chercheur-e-s de toutes disciplines.

Les propositions de communication, de 300 mots maximum et accompagnées d’une courte notice bio-bibliographique, devront être envoyées conjointement à :

Le colloque aura lieu les 11 et 12 juin à l’Université de Lorraine, sur le campus du Saulcy (Metz).

Le colloque sera accompagné d’une exposition qui se tiendra à la galerie 0.15 // Essais Dynamiques située à Metz, du 20 Mai au 12 Juin. Celle-ci sera également intégrée au programme des Rainbow Weeks, festival des fiertés LGBTQ.

Des propositions artistiques (œuvres plastiques ou audiovisuelles, performances, etc.) en lien avec les thématiques présentées par cet appel peuvent donc être soumises également.

Dans ce cas, nous vous invitons à joindre :
– un descriptif de la ou des œuvre(s) proposée(s), idéalement accompagné de photos.
– une brève notice biographique.

La sélection sera réalisée par les responsables de la galerie et le comité d’organisation du colloque.

Bibliographie indicative

Baroque, Fray & Eanelli Tegan (trad) (2016), Vers la plus queer des insurrections, Paris : Libertalia

Burk, Tara Jean-Kelly (2015). Let The Record Show: Mapping Queer Art and Activism in New York City, 1986-1995. Thèse de doctorat.

Clay, Andreana (2007). Like an Old Soul Record: Black Feminism, Queer Sexuality, and the Hip-Hop Generation. Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism 8(1), 53-73. Duke University Press.

Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2015). Queerness in heavy metal: Metal Bent. London & New York: Routledge.

Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2016). Metal, masculinity and the queer subject. In Heavy Metal, Gender and Sexuality (pp. 63-76). Routledge.

Clifford-Napoleone, Amber R. (2018). Queering Kansas City Jazz: Gender, Performance, and the History of a Scene. University of Nebraska Press.

Duyvendak, Jan Willem (1994), Le poids du politique. Nouveaux mouvements sociaux en France. Paris : L’Harmattan.

Fillieule, Olivier (1998). Mobilisation gay en temps de sida. Les études gay et lesbiennes, 81-97.

Fillieule, Olivier, & Duyvendak, Jan Willem (1999). Gay and lesbian activism in France: Between integration and community-oriented movements. The global emergence of gay and lesbian politics: National imprints of a worldwide movement, 184-213.

Gras-Velázquez, Adrian (2012). Queering and De-queering the Home: Private and Public Space in Contemporary Spanish Cinema. The International Journal of the Humanities, 9, 257-68.

Harvey, Keith. (1998). Translating camp talk: Gay identities and cultural transfer. The Translator, 4(2), 295-320.

Ingram, Gordon Brent, Bouthillette, Anne-Marie, & Retter, Yolanda (Eds.). (1997). Queers in space: Communities, public places, sites of resistance. Bay Press.

Kheshti, Roshana (2009). Cross‐Dressing and Gender (Tres) Passing: The Transgender Move as a Site of Agential Potential in the New Iranian Cinema. Hypatia, 24(3), 158-177.

Kim, Ungsan (2017). Queer Korean cinema, national others, and making of queer space in Stateless Things (2011). Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema, 9(1), 61-79.

Lebovici, Elisabeth (2017), Ce que le sida m’a fait : Arts et activisme à la fin du XXe siècle, JRP Ringier, Éditions Maison Rouge.

Leperlier, François (2006). Claude Cahun, l’exotisme intérieur, Paris : Fayard, 2006.

Leung, Helen Hok-sze (2001). Queerscapes in Contemporary Hong Kong Cinema. positions: east asia cultures critique 9(2), 423-447. Duke University Press. 

Logie Carmen H. & Rwigema Marie-Jolie (2014). “The Normative Idea of Queer is a White Person”: Understanding Perceptions of White Privilege Among Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women of Color in Toronto, Canada. Journal of Lesbian Studies, 18:2, 174-191.

Loist, Skadi (2015), Queer Film Culture: Performative Aspects of LGBT/Q Film Festivals, Thèse de doctorat en philosophie, Université de Hambourg, Allemagne.

Lorenz, Renate & Bortolotti, Marie-Mathilde (2018), Art queer: une théorie freak, Paris : B42.

Marchetti, Gina (2017). Handover Bodies in a Feminist Frame: Two Hong Kong Women Filmmakers’ Perspectives on Sex after 1997. Screen Bodies, 2(2), 1-24. 

Meinert, Philipp (2018). Homopunk History. Mayence: Ventil Verlag.

Plana, Muriel, & Sounac, Frédéric (dir) (2015). Esthétique(s) queer dans la littérature et les arts : sexualités et politiques du trouble. EUD-Editions Universitaires Dijon.

Rüegg, Jana (2018). From Content to Context: A Comparative Analysis of the Covers of Translated Versions of Sara Stridsberg’s Beckomberga. DiGeSt, Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies , 5(2), 23-44.

Schwartz, Andi. (2016). Critical Blogging: Constructing Femmescapes Online. Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, No.9.

Schulman, Sarah. (2018). La Gentrification des esprits, Paris : B42.

Summers, Claude (Ed.). (2012). The Queer Encyclopedia of Music, Dance, and Musical Theater. Cleis Press Start.

Ukaegbu, Victor (2007) Grey silhouettes: black queer theatre on the post-war British stage. In: Godiwala, D. (ed.) Alternatives Within the Mainstream II: Queer Theatres in Post-war Britain. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 322-338.

Arts, cultures et activismes LGBTI et queer

Ce carnet a pour vocation d’accompagner le montage et le déroulé du colloque “Arts, Cultures et Activismes LGBTI et queer”, qui se tiendra à Metz (Université de Lorraine, Campus du Saulcy) en juin 2020.

En effet quelques années après la loi française du « Mariage pour tous », les associations LGBTQI sont animées par de nouvelles luttes, autour de la PMA ou de la conservation de leurs archives. En s’appuyant sur ces dynamiques actuelles ou passées, ce projet de recherche souhaite interroger les liens entre arts, cultures et activismes LGBTQI et ouvrir pour ce faire un espace d’échanges, de réflexions et de dialogues tant aux universitaires qu’aux acteur-rice-s de terrain.

Il s’agira de favoriser les interactions entre le monde de la recherche, les associations et le public afin de constituer un réseau réunissant chercheur-e-s, spécialistes et étudiant-e-s autour des problématiques abordées. Les retombées de notre projet ont donc vocation à encourager la circulation des savoirs et des expertises au sein d’un réseau tant scientifique qu’associatif. Nous souhaitons également faire de ce projet l’occasion de constituer un corpus documentaire et de diffuser les résultats de recherches et réflexions collectives qui pourront par la suite servir d’appui à de nouveaux travaux.